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that update. >> elizabeth cohen is going to join us a little bit later on from our medical unit. she is going to have more about max schwolert's heartbreaking story, his case and this story in general. back after this. for only 1-cent after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast! [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >>> so we broke the news yesterday that president obama had plans to nominate his chief of staff, jack lew, for treasury secretary. now, the official announcement will be made at 1:30 p.m. eastern today. if confirmed, lew would succeed timothy geithner, the last member of the original economic team that took office four years ago. that was, of course, you'll remember, at the height of the world economic crisis. dan lothian joins us live at the the white house. boy, did you ever have the news yesterday. you were the first on the air with it. what's the reaction been, though. you know it doesn't take long before the kniv
, our senior medical correspondent, elizabeth cohen is in ft. worth, texas, and she's been tracking all three of these illnesses. i want to start with the most serious and the one creating the most headlines, this flu. so, we are seeing this slowdown that i just mentioned but the numbers are still high. put it in perspective for me, if you can today, elizabeth. >> reporter: do you know what, ashleigh, if you look overall at the whole country, the numbers have gone down slightly, the amount of flu activity. however, do you know what, you really don't care what the flu's like halfway across the country, you care about what it's like where you live. so, in some parts of the country particularly the southeast, the numbers are going down. in other parts they're going up. this is very classic of a flu season. these numbers kind of go up and down. but, you know, what we're hoping is that this is sort of the beginning of flu overall going down. still lots of flu out there. still get a vaccine if you haven't gotten one already. >> is this sort of not, you know, overstated about getting the vacci
't have to be as concerned. my colleague, elizabeth cohen is reporting, a person in the their teens, ended up dying. it's not to be an alarmist. this could be presented and if addressed earlier enough can be treated. doesn't mean rush to the hospital by any answer o means but know the symptoms and if they get bad, do go. >> dr. gupta, thank you so have. >>> for numbers on the job front. 371,000 people filed first-time claims last week. up $4,000 from the week before. this is the first unemployment report, by the way, of 2013. when it comes to ending gun violence, vice president joe biden, made it very clear, if congress doesn't pass new gun laws, the president could go it alone as in bypass congress, and issue an executive order. >> the president is going to act. there are executive orders -- executive action that can be taken. weefbt decided what that is yet but we're compiling it all with the help of the attorney general and cabinet members as well as legislative action we believe is require. >> they took his words as a threat. saying it's tripping them of their second ahelpment rights.
. >> the hospital says the health and safety of the patients is the top priority. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> this nurse she treats some of the sickest patients and if they get the flu there could be some serious health consequences. >> right, if you or i get the flu it's unpleasant, we're out of work for a couple of days or maybe a week, we don't feel well but we're probably not going to die but when someone is that sick in the hospital or in a hospice, if they get the flu, they could die and in fact 36,000 people a year die from the flu, so it's a serious thing for these patients. >> so this hospital has this mandatory policy. is this becoming more common? >> it is becoming more common because the only protection really for these very sick patients, of course they get the flu shot themselves, but it's so surround them with people who have also been vaccinated, so before around 2005 hospitals didn't really care so much, they didn't really push this, but then they started to push it and look at these numbers. it really tells you s
. it seems unbelievable. if it seems such, it just may be. elizabeth cohen joins me live to answer to this miracle. you know, i thought this might be a first-time thing. but it's happened a few times before. double arm transplants. how do they do it? it seems so intricate. >> they have to reconnect everything. you can imagine, this is surgery done at times with a microstop. you're reconnecting -- microscope. you're reconnecting every muscle, every tendon, every nerve. and you're connecting blood vessels. if that limb doesn't get blood, that limb will die. i was just on the phone with a surgeon who's done these before. he said that is the part that really makes you sweat is when you have to put that circulatory system back together. so okay oh is the seventh person -- marrocco is the seventh person to have this double arm transplant. the surgeon told me the biggest part of success is what part of the arm the transplant is done. the closer to the wrist the better. in simple terms, the more of the arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the task is. and brendan's actually, it's
. >>> better news this morning about the flu. cnn's elizabeth cohen got a look at new numbers out from the cdc, numbers set to officially be released later today. the number of cases are actually down with 24 states reporting high levels of flu last week, compared to 29 the week before. however, there were two more pediatric deaths, bringing the total to 20 and by pediatric deaths we mean children of course. in chicago, flu patients are overwhelming the city's already strained hospitals though with still quite the outbreak there. here's cnn's ted rowlands. >> no nausea at this point. >> reporter: deborah cross started feeling sick on monday, three days later she ended up in the emergency room at cook county hospital in chicago, where it was so busy, she had to wait four hours to be seen. >> decided to be safe and come here make sure that everything was okay. >> reporter: several hospitals in chicago this week were forced to reject patients for several hours because of so many flu cases. on monday, 11 different hospitals in the chicago area couldn't handle any more patients. non-life-threatenin
. pros and cons of being slightly overweight. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spells them out next. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their buddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> this story is for me and probably everybody watching. if you packed on a couple of extra pounds over the holidays, excuse me, you might not have to worry so much about it. according to a new study, being a little overweight might help you live longer. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. i'm going to live to be 150 then. >> oh, please. you're one of the most fit people i know. >> it sounds counterintuitive. help us understand this. we can ditch our diet. >> we have been preached at all thes
correspondent elizabeth cohen has a special airing tonight on 25 shocking medical mistakes. and she joins me now. elizabeth, this is you know, it's trouble withing to say the least. >> it is trouble withing. it's not just a hypothetical. i did this special because of mistakes that had happened in my own family. so this can really happen to people and this new study out from johns hopkins puts numbers on it. take a look at these numbers because it makes you go, oh, my goodness. i don't think people realize this. wrong procedures, the wrong procedure is when you go in for a ton sellecktomy and they give you an appendectomy. that happens to 20 patients a week in this country. 20 patients a week have the wrong procedure. now, same number of patients, 20 patientses a week have an operation on the wrong body part. you go in to have your right knee replaced and they replace your left knee. wrong sided surgery. and in addition to 39 patients a week, they have tools surgical tools left in their body. and are sewn up. and yet you have to know these things going in so that you can be prepared. >> i mean, y
again. like hagel, william cohen was a republican senator before he was bill clinton's secretary of defense. >> i think he'll face the same challenge in terms of people on the democratic side saying, wait, we have some pretty talented people that are -- could step in at a moment's notice and fill that spot. and the republicans will say, why are you helping out a democratic administration? >> reporter: one key republican already is challenging hagel. >> i am concerned about many of the comments that he made and has made, like reference to a jewish lobby, which i don't believe exists, i believe a pro-israel lobby exists. >> others insist hagel is not anti-israel. >> he belongs to a sort of tough minded -- in this case republican view of israel. that in fact accepts the reality that while the united states and israel are very close allies and will remain close allies their views on every issue cannot be expected to coincide. >> reporter: and critics in the gay and lesbian community have turned around their opposition to hagel. in 1998, hagel opposed james hormel an openly gay man to
is a lot safer. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins me now to explain. what are we talking about in terms of rules? you think they should be there, wouldn't you? >> you would think they definitely should have already been there and safety advocates have been begging for these for years and thrilled the fda doing the basic things. better measures to keep animals out of fields where crops are growing because what they do in fields? poop in fields. we don't want that. better rules to get farm workers to wash their hands and the last one, little gross but i have to say it. okay? got to say it. which is, port-a-potties for the work earls because when they don't have them, what do they do? >> come on. no way, elizabeth. that's not already a regulation? >> no, no. there aren't strict rules like the rules doing here. again, you can see why safety advocates so frustrated because some of the things are so basic. and they're hoping these will be fully implemented. we have done the segments, peanuts, spinach. they seem to go on and on. >> in fact, i was going to bring that up.
activity. the yellow states have local activity. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now. this has been a bad season. i call it the whoop, when i hear that cough, i go you got the whoop. >> and you get away as quuckly as possible. >> you smile and back out of the room. >> how bad has the flu season been? >> it's been one of the worst flu seasons in the past decade, maybe only two or three has been as bad as this year. flu can hit early, like in november, december, which is what happened this year, or it can hit later, like january, february, or even later like march and so this has been a really early flu season. not a terrible flu season, but an early flu season. >> now, because it's so early, does that give us any indication how bad it will get? >> i was talking to folks at the cdc last night, and they said, look, we think it will be a moderate to severe season overall. so, worse than last year but not as bad as some other years. >> when i hear that whoop somewhere in this building -- >> i heard it many times in this building. >> i think i didn't get a flu shot. is
israeli prime minister ariel sharon is active. coming up next, elizabeth cohen explains what this could possibly mean. red lobster's 30 shrimp. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeÑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food differently. just $11.99. offer ends soon! ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. [ male announcer ] engine light on? come to meineke now for a free code scan read and you'll say...my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> after seven years in a coma, former world leader is now showing signs of brain activity. ariel sharon became prime minister of israel back in 2001. he was a major player in the 2003 talks, called for a palestinian state, but then in 2006 he suffered a massive stroke and brain hemorrhage that put him in a vegetative state. well, today his doctors say that sharon appeared to respond to his son's voice
at this. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us from one of the southern states in atlanta. i hope you are feeling okay to do the segment. >> i can't even tell you how many people who i know who were sick with flu or flu-like illness. >> including me. >> and you're up there. >> and i'm up here and i didn't get the flu shot and i don't get it every year. >> ashleigh, did i teach you nothing? >> do you know what, you're brilliant and i'm busy. >> you're very sweet. next year i'm flying up there. >> just how bad is it? is it any different, i always say it's so bad this year, i feel like i say the same story every year. is it something different? is the strain different? >> no, what is weird or a little different is it started early. when you look at the past ten years, there were only two, maybe three seasons where we saw this much flu this early and it kept growing and growing. so, the cdc just a couple of hours ago came out with new numbers i'll share with you, ashleigh, if you look at last week, there were 29 states that had high levels of flu. the week before th
life. >> reporter: elizabeth cohen, cnn, ft. worth, texas. >> thanks for watching, everyone. "cnn newsroom" continues now with martin savidge. you can pick it up from here. >> thanks very much. >> sure. >>> 12:00 p.m. on the east coast, 9:00 a.m. on the west coast. i'm martin savidge in for fredricka whitfield. if you are just tuning in, thank you very much for joining us. these are the top stories we're following right now in the "cnn newsroom." it could be one of the most shocking admissions in sports history. "usa today" is reporting that lance armstrong will admit to doping in an upcoming interview with oprah. we're following that story. >> i said it for seven years. i've said it for longer than seven years. i have never doped. i can say it again. but i've said it for seven years. it doesn't help. >> reporter: help may be something lance armstrong will need a lot of to redeem his reputation after "usa today" reports armstrong will admit to doping throughout his career. the newspaper does not name their source but says it's a person with knowledge of the situation. "usa today"
elizabeth cohen has been following up on this. i'm at an absolute loss. >> it's so hard to be those parents. so hard. you know, the american academy of pediatrics is officially against it. we reached out to autism speaks which is a big advocacy group which is big on autism and their families. they say there is currently no adequate scientific evidence to advocate the use of medical marijua marijuana. they're saying there's this family who's saying they had a good experience, other families who say they've had a good thing. >> other families. how many? is there a group? have they found each other? are they able to lobby? hey, listen. when there are controversial drugs being tested, and you're in fear of dying, you do anything. regardless of what the government says krks which is mann will continue to be a. >> right, so these families have found each other. the eckecles family did it. they're scattered, downline, talking to each other online. i don't think there's a formal lobby or anything. so they live in a state where marijuana is league, then they do what this family did and they try to s
senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. that defies what a lot of people have thought in the past. what's the significance of this research? why is this? >> a lot of women and even some doctors think, hey, just take off the whole breast. a lot of doctors in the know will tell you, wait a minute. when someone's early stage breast cancer, stage one or stage two, lumpectomy plus radiation is the way to go. this study seems to support that. it suggests, it doesn't prove -- i don't want to use the p word. it suggests that having a lumpectomy and radiation is just as good or perhaps even a little better than having a mastectomy. >> i have a million more questions for you. i think the best thing would be for people -- you always say this -- ask your doctor first, right, elizabeth? >> ask your doctor what the options are. i've talked to so many women who have breast cancer and the doctor says let's do this. i say, well, did you ask him
with his family and all of a sudden became very ill. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spoke to his parents about their son's final days. >> the family was getting ready for a joyful christmas when on december 31st, 17-year-old son max started feeling sick. tired, fever. >> he never really got like super sick. >> two days later he was feeling better. played in the snow on vacation in wisconsin. celebrated christmas with his family. but christmas night, max felt sick again. >> excessive like 104.9 fever. we could not break it. >> the next morning, his parents took max to the hospital. where he was diagnosed with the flu. >> within 30 minutes, i mean the doctor was like something really wrong here. his kidneys are starting to fail. >> max was rushed by helicopter to a larger hospital. >> one of the last coherent things he said he looked at me and there were tears rolling down his face. >> he was scared >> he said, mom, i'm scared. >> i said i know, buddy. i am, too. then he saw me crying. he said mom, it's going to be okay. you're going to be okay. i love you. and that's really
the playing field? >> for us it's always about what's in folks' hearts. we have cohen who gets an a on our report card, and we have a new senator like tim scott who is black gets an f every year. when i look at senator scott, i'm very glad that going into the 150th celebration, if you will. of the eman pags prok clags we have one black senator. we should have at least 10. when i look at him, you know, i say quite frankly what wuch my old coaches said about me in a sport i wasn't so good aat. he has nothing but potential. there's nothing but room to improve. we would hope that he would not continue to get fs on the naacp report card? >> is that because he's a republican or what's behind it? >> no. we have republicans that believe in civil rights. unfortunately, he's not one of them, and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rhinos as they call them, these republican whoe believe in civil rights again and again. so, you know, for instance, you take senator specter there recently. he was very good on the same sorts of justice issues i was talking about. you know,
to the hospital. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us by phone from louisville, texas. we have you on the phone because we know you're working on a flu story about kids. give us a preview. >> it's a terrible story of a completely healthy 17-year-old boy who got the flu, you know, kids get the flu, it happens, but it did not, he got very sick, very quickly and unfortunately, he ended up passing away, and this is what sometimes happens with kids. kids can look completely fine, and in less than 24 hours, or about 24 hours later that child is on a respirator in the intensive care unit, and a lot of these kids are just completely healthy kids with no underlying health problems and we don't know why most kids are okay with the flu. they're sick for a little while and get better. some of them die, we just don't know why. >> is it too late to get a flu vaccine to protect our kids, to protect ourselves? >> it isn't too late. that's one of two things i'll tell parents to do, to be empowered parents. this is so crucial. one, get your child the flu shot. we heard that people are still
autism lost their symptoms as they grew older. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen here to talk to me about this study. first, just explain the study. >> it is fascinating because it turns conventional wisdom on its head. doctors thought you can't outgrow autism once you're diagnosed, that's it. you have it. these researchers found 34 kids who were diagnosed with autism by good doctors who know what they're doing as very young kids before the age of 5, and then they -- years later when they looked at them, they didn't have any signs of autism. they were examined and the signs were gone. >> so how is this even possible? >> a couple of things going on. they found in some ways this group of kid had somewhat milder autism to begin with, that's one thing. it could also have something to do with the early intervention that these kids got, some of the training and the schooling and what have you, the therapy these kids got. and it also might have something to do with the children's individual brains. maybe there was something about their brains. and researchers have told me, you know,
. arizona put the most restrictions into effect, seven, and elizabeth cohen went back to texas where roe vs. wade, well, the decision began. we'll learn more about the decision fight today. >> reporter: roe vs. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand, the governor has made this vow -- >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality -- hi, it's elizabeth at cnn. >> great. come on in, ma'am. i'm at the whole woman's health clinic austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> any more ultrasounds? >> i don't think we have any more. >> rorter: amy started whole women's health ten years ago, and her business has grown. she has five clinics in texas, offering gynecology care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is provide an oasis for her where she feels safe, comfortable, at peace. >> reporter: the entire state 27,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the
prohibited abortions except to save the mother's life. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen returned to the state where it all began and spoke to both sides. >> reporter: roe v. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand the governor has made this vow. >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality. it's elizabeth at cnn. >> come on in. >> reporter: i'm at a health clinic in austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> do we have anymore all t ultrasounds? >> i don't think so. >> reporter: she offers a care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is to provide an oasis where she feels safe and at peace. >> reporter: 72,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the u.s., nearly one in three women will have an abortion before the age of 45 according to the nonpartisan guttmacher institute. you have a lot more work to do? >> we have a lot more work to do
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us with more. >> this will really be interesting to see what they find here because nothing quite like this has ever been done. in essence, this is what they're thinking about doing. take 1,000 players and really follow them, look at their medical records, get measurements and look at all sorts of stuff, and then pick your 100 healthiest, and pick your 100 sickest, and then compare them, and one of the things that they will likely be looking for is how much does football have to do with it? are they sicker because they play a certain position or because they played for a longer period of time and talking about current players and former players and so this is something that's been negotiated and talked about. the nfl says nothing is more important than the health and safety of their players and if you're really into this, cnnhealth.com my colleague stephanie smith has a wonderful article. >> i was talking to two nfl players yesterday about concussions and one of them is going to donate his brain to science in essence and he said it's difficult to know exactly
, cheryl cohen greene around this time after the sundance film festival. >> my job is to help a person who is not sick or broken, just like all of us, myself included, to have a better understanding of their sexuality. we don't get a lot of good training and conversation when we are growing up about it and a lot of people come to their sexual feelings and desires from a sense of shame and embarrassment. >> for some viewers, i have to ask what is the difference between what you do and the oldest profession? >> well, my intention is very different. my intention is to not have clients come back. it's an education process that can be a lot of fun and it can be anxiety-provoking which is good because we work with the therapist around the anxiety that might be happening during our sessions. the focus is to help a person go out into the world feeling much better about who they are so they can share that with another person. >> i want to talk about the film. we mentioned the film based on your experience counselling this one man in particular. this poet, mark o'brien who got polio with a child and
of state -- at leas for now. massachusetts governor patrick naming william cohen, his former chief of staff to the crary of state submitted his resignation last night. microsoft founder bill gates speaking out about immigration. we'll hear from him next. campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. [ male announcer ] sounds good. can youlyric can.aid do this? lyric can. lyric can. lyric by phonak is the world's only 24/7, 100% invisible hearing device. it's tiny. but that might be the least revolutionary thing about lyric. lyric can be worn 24/7 for up to four months, without battery changes. call 1-800-414-5999 for a risk-free trial. cookie: there's absolutely no way anyone can see it even if they get right up to my ear. michael: wake up, go to sleep...showering, running, all your activities. lyric can also give you exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your heari
health danger? elizabeth cohen has the signs to watch out for. elizabeth? >> brooke, kids are especially vulnerable to the flu. and parents really need to be vigilant. i spent the day yesterday with the mom who got her son help in the nick of time. darius carr is so sick with the flu, he's in the hospital. he could have died if not for the quick thinking of his mother. robbie carrie was keeping a close eye on her son at home. he didn't seem all that sick, then suddenly wednesday night -- >> he could hardly breathe. he was, you know, gasping for, you know, breath, and that was real scary because i thought he was going to pass out at any minute. >> reporter: robbie immediately brought her 7-year-old son to the emergency room. it is just a short drive away, but by the time they got there, darius was incoherent. how did you feel in your heart when your own son didn't know who you were? >> you don't want to think the worst, but as a parent you can't help it. >> reporter: the flu had struck darius hard. his asthma making it even worse. doctors had to give him oxygen. looking for red flags like
steps. this really is a very touching moment. elizabeth cohen joins us to talk about his journey. i mean, how did he do this? >> it was a year-long journey. he had a stroke that, as you can see, made it extremely difficult to walk. he had to relearn all of that. you know what part of the key was? he went through a rehab program very intensive. it wasn't just all the regular stuff that they do. it was a lot of walking. it was a lot of going up stairs. it was very intense. it went on longer than many other rehab programs do. we were talking to a prominent stroke doctor today, suzanne, and he wishes every stroke patient had this kind of rehab and that it didn't just end. it goes on for years and years even after someone appears to be getting better. >> members of congress have a great insurance package and great medical coverage. is that the thing that normal stroke patients would have access to when you look at what he was able to do? >> this doctor said a lot of health insurance programs give you a set time, a matter of a couple of months for rehab and say you're done. when you have great
, could facebook be making you envy yio and if so, what should you do about it? elizabeth cohen joins us. what did the study find? >> the study looks at german college students. pretty specific group of people. what they found is one out of three of them said that they had feelings, like specific kinds of feelings, such as anger, frustration, or irritation when they used facebook which, as you said, you're supposed to feel connected and happy. it's sort of unfortunate that one out of three felt this. then when they asked more questions they got to the bottom of it which is that there was feelings of envy. >> and what triggers it? what are the specific events or postings that get people angry? >> they're on facebook looking around and you see someone's vacation pictures. wow, they had a great time on their vacation. or you see a picture of someone in a happy moment, like newborn babies. or you see social success. wow, boy, they're at a party with 30 people. wow, they have more friends than i do. it's the same kind of thing that makes you envious in real life, right? except on facebook it'
double arm transplants. want to bring in elizabeth cohen. i love stories like this. it's like wow. >> amazing. >> to see that guy smile and say i'm hopeful when he looks at the other arm, maybe this other arm will work well. how did they do this? >> get to one why arm is doing better than the other arm. it may have to do with where the transplants took place. on the right one it was actually above, so the new arm is -- it was here, it was from here down. the other one from somewhere around here down. the more arm you have to transplant the more difficult time somebody's going to have. so that's an important thing to remember. so the more arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the recovery's going to be because these doctors are putting together tendons, muscles, nerves, blood vessels. really tiny surgery. they practiced on cadavers first which i thought was fascinating. trained surgeons, they practiced on cadavers first. >> is it possible that -- he's hopeful, the second arm, is it possible he will have full functioning arms at some point? >> he may not have full functioni
in our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. hopeful for the future. so rare that he has been able to go through successfully this surgery. what does it entail? >> it entails a very long surgery, where doctors have to tediously reconnect muscles, tendons, nerves, blood vessels. i was talking to a doctor, not at hopkins, but somewhere else, who has done a similar one, done the same thing. he said what really made him sweat was the blood vessels. if you don't do it just right, that limb isn't going to get any blood and it will just die. and so that's why these hopkins doctors, they train on cadavers for the past couple of months. they worked on cadavers to practice before they did the real thing. so it is just amazing that this can work at all. and he mentioned that in the one arm, which has -- they transplanted more, he had, that's not his real elbow on that arm, he doesn't have much motion and hopefully after lots of physical therapy that will happen. >> what i love about the story is his spirit and his hope. and i want our viewers to take a listen to what he said what he's mo
test underground. >>> also today, massachusetts governor duvall patrick named william cohen to serve as interim u.s. senator, thus replacing senator john kerry. cowan is the chief of staff. he will serve until kerry's successor is chosen in a special election. kerry was confirmed yesterday as secretary of state. >>> that 15-year-old pakistani school girl who was shot in the head by the taliban will undergo more surgery. malala will receive a titanium plate to repair her shattered skull. shown here. you see the big hole. and also she'll be getting a hearing device to replace her destroyed eardrum. the taliban shot malala in october, after she was speaking out in support of girls getting an education. the surgery will be performed in birmingham, england, where her father has now gotten a job with the pakistani consulate. >>> and stocks are taking a hit today, but that did not dampen the hype for research in motion's new phone, take a good long look at it here, the blackberry 10, the z-10 as it is officially called. came out today. it contains a new operating software that already has 7
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